• Tag Archives live music
  • Electric Liberation Tour – Line-Up Change

    Some news! It’s been a pretty crazy few weeks in the run up to the Electronic Liberation Tour 2017, and we’ve been fraught with problems behind the scenes, so here’s an update.

    Unfortunately, Syd.31 won’t be able to join us on this tour for personal reasons. We’re gutted too, and hope they can play for you soon.

    The good news though, is that the rest of the team have rallied round, and we’ve roped in some friends as very special guests for the remaining dates on the tour. Twist Helix will be joining us in Newcastle. Check ’em out below

    ded.pixel , St Lucifer and Def Neon will all be performing as normal.

    The running order will be decided closer to the day.

    It’s been rough, but the last thing we want to do is let down the rest of the tour and the people coming along to support us so… bring it on and we’ll see you in November.

    Saturday 25th November 2017
    7:00pm doors
    Head of Steam (ThinkTank Underground), 2 Neville Street, Newcastle, NE1 5EN
    £8 adv. / £10 otd.  Ticket Link
    18+ only

     


  • KMFDM – new video – show next week!

    We’re just a week away from history being made as KMFDM come to Newcastle for the first time ever.  Hitting up Think Tank on September 5th, this will certainly be a night to remember.

    They’ve just recently unleashed stunning new album ‘Hell Yeah’ and you can check out a lyric video to the title track here and the new video for ‘Murder My Heart’ below

    Don’t forget, very special guest Lord of the Lost are coming along for this tour – and you can check out the video for their new track ‘Waiting for you to die’ here

    We’re also chuffed to welcome Inertia back on this run, who will be in support of new single ‘Only Law’ – which you can check out here.

    This has been an extremely popular show and understandably a lot of tickets have sold, which should be lovely and cosy in a 250 capacity venue.

    If you wish to purchase them, you can grab them from seetickets.com they are £16 plus BF (so, £17.60) which makes them the cheapest on the the tour.  There may be some available on the door, but these will be priced at £20 – so save some money and guarantee your place.


  • EU Referendum and the Music Industry

    Unless you’ve been under a rock for a while, you’ll be aware that next Thursday the UK will host a referendum on whether to continue to be a member of the European Union.

    Like us, you’re probably bored of some of the tit for tat, scaremongering and prophecies of doom by both sides.

    It’s one of those really difficult things as facts are unfortunately scarce, there is no real “use case” on leaving the EU and then negotiating new trade terms.
    We can point to Switzerland and Norway for pros and cons of either argument, but neither of those has been previous part of the EU.

    We are seriously concerned about the impact that this vote could have on the music industry.
    I don’t want to scaremonger, or exaggerate – there’s been too much of that in the press – but to share our concerns.
    We do use the word “could” so will try to explain the possibilities.

    The music industry has had a lot of problems in recent years. Some it hasn’t always tackled the best way (Metallica suing Napster springs to mind) and on the whole, the music industry will get through whatever happens, but, will have to adapt and change again.

    A vote to remain would do little to improve the music industry, but, a vote to leave would likely throw up a lot of extra barriers which would make it more difficult for smaller bands, niche bands, DIY labels, DIY and small promoters.

    At the moment – we have free movement with the EU. This a free movement of people, goods, trade. Impact to any of those will impact the music industry.

    While many point to Norway or Switzerland – they have the free movement of people, goods, trade as part of their agreement with the EU.

    So. Potential impacts.

    Last year, British artists accounted for over 17 percent of album sales in the six largest European markets after the UK—Germany, France, Sweden, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands—where they enjoyed nearly a third of the share.
    Any tarrifs brought in on exports of music would cut the revenues for the labels and ultimately the artists.
    At a time when artists are seeing lower sales, often blamed on the rise of the internet.

    This would have a biggest impact on smaller or niche markets – it’s not that I don’t care about Adele, but, there is a big appetite for alternative rock, metal, Goth, Industrial and associated in Europe and it’s the smaller acts, niche labels, DIY, who are likely to feel the pinch more.

    If bands are receiving even less revenue from their records than present, many more will be unable to afford to contine.

    For companies like us, it’s obviously in our best interest that bands are making money from records as that is what keeps them afloat.

    I may, one day, document how little bands actually make from touring. Obviously Iron Maiden do alright, but I mean – well – any band asking £20 or less per ticket.

    Any restriction on movements of goods and/or people would increase the cost of touring.

    This is of course where we are most concerned.

    First off. Bands would be required to produce a Carnet.
    A Carnet is published documentation stating all of the equipment a band will be touring with.
    It costs between £1000-£2000 (depending on circumstances) and last just 12 months.
    This is 2 way for European bands coming into the UK and for UK bands going out – so – a band doing a 10 day UK tour has an extra £100-£200 per show to cover – the only way to cover this is in a fee and this will inevitably push ticket prices up. Again, top end bands, say, Nine Inch Nails, can probably absorb this fairly easily – a band doing club shows to 100 people per night asking £14 per ticket instead of £12 is going to be noticable to fans and, of course, may start to put some off.

    This would also be fairly costly and restrictive for UK bands to tour within Europe – detrimental to their development and denying them of experiences.

    This also adds in complications if gear is broken/lost on tour, or if new gear is bought to complete the tour, the band will have to pay taxes at customs upon leave/return.

    And, of course, the risk that every time you cross a border or checkpoint that someone could ask to do a full stocktake of all your gear on board.

    Older bands may remember the days of the Carnet, queuing at each border and then a risk that every piece of gear would have to be unloaded and checked against the serial numbers which is both stressful and time consuming… and if there’s any discrepancies, bands can be sent back to the previous border point – which can end up wasting half a day or so.

    This is of course before I mention every band’s most hate word…. Visas.

    I deliberately didn’t mention this first – because – well, it’s possible for a trade deal to continue to allow free movement and if bands can come and go without a Visa we don’t have much problem, but, they may of coruse still need the Carnet above.

    Any restriction to free movement “A points based system”, “Paperwork” whatever is extra work for the bands (when they should be practicing and writing new songs!) and of course the extra expense involved.

    In the past 18 months I am aware of a few visa problems.
    Our own problem was with Eric Martin who, in December 2014, was refused entry to the UK on the paperwork. We still do not know what was wrong.
    This caused financial loss to Eric, to the touring support act, to the agent, to us. This caused inconvenience to the fans who’d made arrangements for the tour, booked trains, hotels, time off work, etc.
    This is always a concern when visas are involved.
    We also have other examples, The Last Dance were detained on their way to Whitby Goth Weekend and of course Zardonic did not receive paperwork in time to take his slot at Resistanz Festival.
    Going the other way, Surgyn had to delay their part of the Aesthetic Perfection US tour as paperwork didn’t come through in time and they are one of many bands who has forked out a lot of money for Visas that were either delayed, restricted, or denied.

    In order to get a visa as a band, you often have to prove you are a real “credible” band and for niche bands this can be quite hard to build up enough evidence.

    This is before we get into things like filing taxes on tours, copyright agreements, or of course that the whole of the EU is currently open for bands to choose where to print flyers, posters, records, merchandise in order to find the most appropriate deal for them.

    The best case scenario in the event of a leave is that all free movements remains in place – and leaving just becomes a pointless tickbox exercise.

    The absolute worst case scenario
    – Bands will receive less for music they sell outside the UK.
    – The impact of this being they don’t receive the income required to stay afloat
    – It will be more expensive for European bands to tour the UK (and depending on Visa changes, could make it more expensive for all non-UK bands to tour the UK)
    – As a result, more bands will omit the UK
    – And others will see higher ticket prices
    – Which will put more strain on risk on small venues and independent promoters
    – It will become more expensive for UK bands to tour in Europe
    – Alternative genres like Rock, Metal, Goth, Industrial are likely to be affected the most

    We suspect the actual result in the event of a leave to be somewhere in the middle

    There is a lot more to the referendum than music.
    Some of you will read this and feel that it’s still a risk worth taken or believe you will be better off and thus be happier to pay more to see bands play.
    I don’t want to be argumentative.

    But – we are an independent promotions company which is not our main source of income.
    We can not afford to absorb price rises and believe higher ticket prices for small/medium bands would lower turnouts and have a knock on effect to venues and bands.
    Regardless of the vote, we will strive to continue. We would of course have to consider new negatives when considering any shows to book.
    We just want to put bands on people like, at a good price. We also want our friends in smaller bands to be able to do gig swaps with bands in the EU fairly easily, should they wish, for the fun, experience and development.
    From a company perspective, we are In.


  • The Golden Age of Nothing join Cold in Berlin show

    Another welcome addition to the Cold in Berlin show in The Head of Steam on May 30th.

    We’d already announced Mausoleums and now we’re thrilled to announce that Teeside Psychedelia act The Golden Age of Nothing will also be performing as part of the bill.

    Tickets are available here and priced just £6 in advance (£8 door).

    TGAON describe themselves as “Gothic psychedelia from Stockton on Tees. Drum machine, distortion pedals, viola gone mad and throbbing bass churning out songs of dead Russian spacemen, the end of the world and polar expeditions gone wrong, all sung with an echo of the blackest humour.”

    You can check out their video for ‘Black Wings’ below


  • Mortiis – New Album, Video and Tour

    unnamed (2)MORTIIS’ ‘THE GREAT DECEIVER’ ALBUM AND ‘DEMONS ARE BACK’ VIDEO OUT NOW
    The Great Deceiver, the long-awaited ninth album from Norway’s Mortiis will officially was released on March 4 via Omnipresence, and a video for the album’s “Demons are Back” has been revealed in conjunction.

    The Great Deceiver‘s long and tortured state of evolution took its toll equally on the band and its namesake, leading Mortiis to so much as state that the record killed the band. “As important as is it to myself and who I have become, I haven’t been able to think about it in any way other than ‘I need to just get this thing out of my life and behind me before I lose my mind,’” he said.

    Saturated with themes of anger, greed, confusion, self-doubt and re-discovery, The Great Deceiver is undoubtedly Mortiis’ most mature album to date. But that maturity came at a great cost mentally. “When we started talking about it and writing the record, we were a band, we had two managements, merch deals and tours were happening,” Mortiis said. “During the course of the writing, recording, re-writing, and re-recording, we lost the connection with almost everyone. There were fallings out with band members to the point where we had to let them go. It was usually about delusion and defeat, the realization of being f**ked with and not getting the recognition deserved. It was never pretty, but in hindsight always understandable.

    “I have been accused of being a lot of things: self-centered, manipulative, unstable, hot- headed, paranoid, the list goes on. Most everyone I have spent some time with have had beefs with me. They´re all right, too…it’s the price of being driven and passionate – or just narrow minded and obsessive – about something is often the loss of friends and colleagues.”

    mortiispromo

    The Great Deceiver builds on Mortiis’ past dabbling in metal and industrial, with aggressive guitar-driven crossover metal meeting industrial-type electronics. Although genre-defying, The Great Deceiver is Mortiis’ most accessible release to date.

    With its hauntingly memorable chorus, “Demons are Back” is a perfect example of this accessibility, while also providing an overall narrative for the album.

    “Anger, resentment…I hate everyone,” the band’s namesake said. “These feelings are like waves. During the ‘good times’ they are far away in the distance, and occasionally they come washing ashore in huge waves of ‘I hate everyone.’ It’s a thin line between being in sync with the world and wanting to annihilate everyone you see. ‘Demons are Back’ is a conflicted song, in the sense that I let both sides in, or out, and both voices are heard. It’s therapeutic in a sense, and in another sense it is chaotic and confusing. But, again, I try to create some sort of positivity in the harangue of spitefulness. It’s really down to the logical, sensible me, telling the disturbed, pessimistic me to chill out.”

    The video shows a grotesquely-masked voyeur watching dystopian scenes of utter despair, sadism and eventually, suicide through an array of TV screens, as his own life ends violently. “The mask was inspired partly by a very violent dream I once had,” said Mortiis. “The violence was absolutely relentless.”unnamed (1)

    The clip uses scenes from writer/director Charlie Deaux’s Zoetrope, a film based upon Franz Kafka’s In the Penal Colony. At the suggestion of Deaux, whom Mortiis previously work with on “The Grudge” video, the band spent a day in Oslo filming additional footage to splice in with images from the original film. With a minimal set and crew – guitarist Levi Gawron acting as directing and Mortiis himself handling special effects – the band captured original scenes that seamlessly compliment those from Zoetrope in frantic stop-motion created by Deaux himself.

    “Demons are Back” is available here.

    Order “The Great Deceiver” online.

    Mortiis plays The Cluny in Newcastle on May 23rd – support comes from Seraph Sin and deadfilmstar

    Tickets can be purchased here.


  • Combichrist and Filter on MEGA Tour

    CCH photo 300x200Newcastle Riverside – June 29th

    Tickets already selling very fast – secure yours from www.seetickets.com

     

    This summer, we will be bringing the ultimate Industrial-Rock-line-up on the road, the likes of which Europe has not seen before. With the double-headliner dream team Combichrist and Filter, the German high-flyers Lord Of The Lost and Mexican Industro-Punks Rabia Sorda, the scene’s greatest team of super heroes is setting out to rock Europe’s stages to the ground:

    Live, Norwegian-American collective Combichrist has the rightful reputation for unleashing pure excess in a hellish ride of Metalcore, Industrial, Electronica, flying drum parts and unabated madness. Armed with their brand-new album and fueled by the pure essence of sex, drugs and Rock’n’Roll, Combichrist want YOU!

    FIL photo 02-2016US-Industrial-Rock-legend Filter is the kind of band that doesn’t really really require an introduction. Their albums are genre-classics and their newest release „Crazy Eyes“, the group is in full on attack mode, again. On stage, they will sweep you off your feet with Richard Patrick’s exceptional voice, an infernal performance and a maelstrom of aggression and emotions.

    Special guest is Mexican-German group Rabia Sorda. The wild Electro-Punk-Industrial-bastard-brainchild of Hocico-front-man Erk Aicrag is a whirlwind on stage and the ideal opener for an this kind of tour, with his ability to really get a crowd going.

    The tour comes to Newcastle at The Riverside on June 29th

    Secure your ticket from www.seetickets.com


  • Dorje Return set for Sunderland Show

    Dorje
    live at Sunderland Independent

    May 27th 2016

    After two great shows last year, Dorje return to the region – this time hitting up Sunderland Independent – in order to be closer to fans who couldn’t quite make it last time and close enough for those who could.

    If you’re unfamiliar with Dorje, they’re a great modern technical band – not too dissimilar to Alter Bridge or Incubus, they are also really well connected to their fans – harnessing social media and holding many clinics and Q+A sessions. Dave “Chappers” Chapman is a complete guru when it comes to guitars and gear (and even built a custom range based on fan feedback!) and this really helps turn them into an approachable, professional and quality band.

    Check em out here : http://www.dorje.tv/ or on Rob’s youtube channel here 

    Tickets are £10 in advance from www.seetickets.com – Reflex -etc
    You can also pick up VIP tickets for just £20 (includes meet and greet, poster, entry, etc)


  • Ayria / Inertia return for co-headline show with special local guests

    ayriaposterIn 2014 we hosted a double-header of two great electro bands, Ayria and Inertia. It was very well received and a good fun night.

    Well… we’re doing it again.

    June 9th we welcome back Ayria and Inertia for their joint 2016 tour. It’s in support of new material from both bands and is dubbed the ‘Paper Dolls’ tour.

    Ayria recently released an EP, ‘Feed Her to the Wolves’, which contained two new songs – you can stream or buy it here – her new album Paperdolls is out this Friday, April 22nd.

    The most recent video from Inertia is for ‘Dark Valentine’ – you can view that here

    They will be joined by local synth duo Eurasianeyes – check them out here

    Tickets are just £10 in advance – you can purchase from www.seetickets.com or locally from Reflex Records